PESSTO Data

PESSTO Special data release - nebular spectra of superluminous supernovae (27th Jan 2017)

The paper by Anders Jerkstrand et al. LONG-DURATION SUPERLUMINOUS SUPERNOVAE AT LATE TIMES, (Jerkstrand A. et al. The Astrophysical Journal, Volume 835, Issue 1, article id. 13, 23 pp. 2017), contains spectra from ESO (VLT + FORS2, VLT + Xshooter, NTT + EFOSC2) for three superluminous supernovae at late times. LSQ14an and SN2015bn/PS15ae were PESSTO follow-up targets.

Figure 7 of Jerkstrand et al. (2017):

There are various corrections applied to the spectra to scale them to photometry and to subtract off the host galaxy contributions. The paper includes photometry corrected and host galaxy subtracted spectra of SN2007bi using new photometry of the host that was not available at the time of the original publication in Gal-Yam et al. (2009, Natur.,
462, 624)
.

The scaling and corrections are described in the paper. Here we release the various spectra, including our calculated host galaxy spectra, and a detailed README file to describe each of the data products available.

DOWNLOAD THE DATA HERE

When using these data, please cite the Jerkstrand et al. paper, and also (if using 2007bi data) the Gal-Yam et al. (2009) paper as the original data source.

The data are also available through WISeREP.

PESSTO SSDR3 Released (December 2016)

PESSTO SSDR3 Data Release has been published and is now available for download from the ESO Data Archive. The spectra can be accessed from here and the SOFI imaging data from here.

In four years of operations, PESSTO has taken spectra of 1168 distinct objects. From this list, 161 supernovae (10 of which are super-luminous supernovae), 2 supernova imposters, 3 Tidal Disruption Events, 1 unclassified objects and 1 AGN were picked as interesting science targets and these were scheduled for follow-up time series EFOSC2 optical spectroscopy, with the brightest also having SOFI spectra taken.

In total SSDR3 contains 21.29GB of data. In total there are 2851 EFOSC2 spectra released. These include 1753 EFOSC spectra of the 168 PESSTO Key Science targets which are chosen for detailed follow-up. The remaining 1098 EFOSC spectra relate to 1000 objects for which we took classification spectra but did not pursue a detailed follow-up campaign. 224 SOFI spectra where also taken of the Key Science targets.

Total number of science files released in the various formats is described in the table below.

The release descriptions for the data products can be found here and further information can be found in the ESO news archive.

From detailed download instructions please read our wiki article.

If you use these data in a publication, please add the following acknowledgement AND a citation to our PESSTO Survey paper, Smartt et al. 2015 A&A, 579, 40:

“This work is based (in part) on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile as part of PESSTO, (the Public ESO Spectroscopic Survey for Transient Objects Survey) ESO program 188.D-3003, 191.D-0935, 197.D-1075.”

PESSTO SSDR2 (3rd August 2015)

PESSTO SSDR2 has been published and is now available for download from the ESO Data Archive and the ESO Catalogue Facility.

In its second year of operations, PESSTO has taken spectra of 395 distinct objects, bringing the overall total to 681 objects. During this second year 42 supernovae and 1 AGN were chosen as interesting science targets and scheduled for follow-up time series EFOSC2 optical spectroscopy, with the brightest also having SOFI spectra (the 1 AGN was not followed in detail).

In total 798 EFOSC2 spectra have been released. These include 411 EFOSC2 spectra of our science targets which are chosen for detailed follow-up. The other 387 EFOSC spectra are related to the 352 objects for which PESSTO took classification spectra (these were not followed in detail).

Total number of science files released in various formats.

Alongside the spectral and imaging data products we have now released two catalogues. The first is the PESSTO Transient Catalogue, a catalogue of 556 sources for which a meaningful spectral classification has been obtained up to the 1st March 2014. The catalogue includes spectral classifications and phases, host galaxy identifications, angular separations from the hosts and redshift information.

The second catalogue is a catalogue of multi-epoch, multi-band photometry for all objects which PESSTO has completed a followup campaign.

The release descriptions for both the data products and the transient catalogue can be found here and for the mutli-epoch photometry catalogue can be found here.

Further information can be found in the ESO news archive.

From detailed download instructions please read our wiki article.

If you use these data in a publication, please add the following acknowledgement

“This work is based (in part) on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile as part of PESSTO, (the Public ESO Spectroscopic Survey for Transient Objects Survey) ESO program 188.D-3003, 191.D-0935.”

And cite Smartt et al. 2015 for reference to the PESSTO Survey.

PESSTO SSDR1 (27th January 2014)

We’re pleased to announce that spectra from the first year of PESSTO (April 2012 - 2013) are released as SSDR1 (Spectral Survey Data Release 1). These have been archived and are available from the ESO Science archive as Phase 3 data products . There are more than 900 spectra for 298 distinct objects (total, including calibrated 2D images is 2.9GB). Near infra-red imaging data from SOFI is also now available from this first year. There are 234 reduced and calibrated near-infrared SOFI images for 22 transient objects (total of 3.6GB).

These are also available from the ESO archive interface for main data products. Note that there is an ESO main query form (for images and spectra) and separate forms specifically for either public survey spectra or image data sets (see the explanation on the ESO Science Archive Facility page).

You can either download these data from the ESO webpages above, or alternatively follow the detailed walk-through guide on our wiki pages.

The images are standard FITS images. The 1D spectra are in binary table format, click here for info on how to read and display.
The new SPTABLE IRAF external package is able to read, display, and analyse (via the onedspec and rv packages) the ESO one-dimensional science spectra.

If you use these data in a publication, please add the following acknowledgement

“This work is based (in part) on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile as part of PESSTO, (the Public ESO Spectroscopic Survey for Transient Objects Survey) ESO program 188.D-3003, 191.D-0935.”

And cite Smartt et al. 2015

All the reduced optical imaging data from EFOSC is also now available to download here. This download includes more than 2500 images, including fully reduced acquisition images (the tarball is 9GB in size). These images are processed, and astrometrically and photometrically calibrated. The latter varies in its reliability and will be described in a forthcoming paper (Smartt et al. 2014, in prep.). Note that the reduced EFOSC2 images are not yet available through the ESO archive since they are not fully compatible Phase 3 products.

WISeREP

Once a classification spectrum has been taken of a transient, we aim to make the spectrum public accessible via the WISeREP database and announce the classification via ATels within 24hrs of the observation.

Brief instructions on how to find data in WISeREP

  1. Navigate to the web portal of the WISeREP database.
  2. Public1 data can be accessed via the two main pages dedicated to Objects and Spectra (main menu on the left).
  3. On both the Objects and Spectra pages you are presented with various query fields. Tailor your query to find the objects you require, making sure to select ‘PESSTO’ from the Programs drop-down list, and submit your query.

Here are a couple of permalinks for your convenience:

ESO Archive


  1. Note that all PESSTO data is public; you will not need a username and password to access the data.